As you know, July 16th marks the end of summer…well just about.  In a panic, the kids are starting to take seriously their summer reading requirements. In that vein, I have created my own summer reading list. Enjoy!

Ignore Everybody: and 39 Other Ways to Creativity

By Hugh MacLeod

Exploring the idea of creativity and what exactly makes a person artistic, MacLeod shares his best advice and insights, as well as some of his more clever cartoons.  From business to daily life, MacLeod helps readers understand where inspiration comes from and how they can reach their full creative potential. Readers will learn how to stick out from the crowd and gain the confidence they need to put their best ideas forward.  After reading about MacLeod’s 40 keys to creativity, you’ll have the confidence you need to stand out and make a name for yourself in business.

Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin and the Race of a Lifetime

By John Heilemann and Mark Halperin

You may think you know the election of 2008, but how well do you really know it?  Game Change tells the story of the 2008 presidential election in a new and engaging way.  With dialogue and expertly detailed scenes, as well as new interviews and revelations, Game Change looks back on this historic election and exposes some of its most disappointing, exciting and revolutionary moments from behind the scenes.  Only after reading this novel-like account of the election will you be able to understand and appreciate just how groundbreaking this election really was.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

By Rebecca Skloot

Although she used to be known as Henrietta Lacks, this poor, Southern farmer is now simply known as HeLa, well her cells are at least.  Lacks’ cells are known to be the first “immortal” human cells grown in culture.  Even though she has been dead for 60 years, her cells have helped develop the polio vaccine, uncover secrets of cancer, and have even lead to advances in cloning.  In this investigative biography and scientific thriller, Skloot follows the life of this extraordinary woman and her ancestors living today.  By observing this astonishing scientific breakthrough, as well as its consequences for Lacks’ family today, Skloot shows just how closely science and society can be related.